A Star’s Journey in the Fine Art World

Comsic view - Eta Carina complex Lha

One photographic view of a sliver of our universe photographed by Paul Haese.

Since the dawn of civilization, art has been used to express ideas. The intricate nature of what elevates a work from common to fine art is more than just in the interpretation of it’s meaning. The curatorial machine of the fine art world has a defined order that follows wealth. A star is born much as those that exist in the heavens above and the society that we dwell. What successful fine artists do to obtain recognition depends on intent and influence. Pouring one’s life journey into each canvas, mold or photographic frame is half of the battle for success. The other depends on who views a work, how it is presented and why it resonates to others. A common saying in the business is “each work eventually finds it’s right collector.”

Chinese conceptial artist - photographer Liu Bolin

Liu Bolin, Hiding in California No. 1 – Hollywood, 2013 courtesy Eli Klen Fine Art

Contemporary fine art, unlike antiquities or other periods long past, has a power to shape the future from the present. Often, comments and expressions reflect and open debate. An artist like Liu Bolin comes to mind. His works so exquisitely and simply hook you into a message – his and your own.

Each of us however transforms over time. Take the abstract artist Alexandra Nechita.

Original Alexandra Nechita Painting Know More Say Less

Know More Say Less, Acrylic on Canvas by Alexandra Nechita 2005 courtesy GALLERY M

Her well documented journey evolved from her “prodigal” period – at age 6 she was discovered to be not just self taught but painting at the critical skill of Picasso. Critics clamored and world media reacted. The fine art world though sat on the bench. They wanted repeated verification of her “skill.” She had to find galleries and museums to further validate her impact. She became a press darling of the 90s and 2000s because of her skill, age and, to some, her gender. Today, her works remain desired and collected. Her passions have lead her to many diverse, art related causes. Has her star power pulsated at it’s brightest or was her’s to be a constant beam of light to a niche group of collectors, fans and admirers? As with the night’s sky, one must know where to look to see the desired star or planet. When found, it may pop and resonate with the seeker/viewer or astronomer. Collectors too must recognize that the treasure before them is impacting and intended.

Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Andy Warhol became the gold standard of their day and remain so today as icons and legacies. Their social clout heralded their work further than others who quietly created equally compelling works. Their value to society – the artistic reach – became markers in time for others to be compared, measured and ultimately valued.

Urban Star

Artist Yiannis George Bellis pops stars with balls with Urban Star, Oil on Wood Panel

An emerging artist today should define their reach, set the course accurately and navigate with vigor. It is a journey that can be explosive – or more often than not – impact a forest where no one has yet to see or hear of their journey.

To view additional works mentioned in this article, visit:

Author: Mason Hayutin

Founder, Editor and contributing writer, Mr. Mason Hayutin is recognized for his depth of experience and knowledge in technology, energy economics, and the arts (fine and visual). Having worked with recognized world class artists and their estates since 1997, Mason brings a wealth of practical experiences from installations, marketing and private sales.

An active business advocate, he successfully released the fine art documentary film LUBIE LOVE in 2009 ahead of the global auto crisis – in addition to maintaining his tenure as Vice President of GALLERY M INC. Hayutin holds a degree in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis. You can read his insight here at The Art Quarterly as well as in regional and national publications.

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