Dumbshit Artist paints National Treasures

There are two categories of artists walking today.  The first is actively walking amongst us concerned about their place in art history based on skill and contribution.  The second is just someone who proclaims to create an object without regard to context.   It is with the later that perhaps America’s dumbest citizen proclaimed her talent to the world by simply defacing national parks – from East Coast to West.  This was, mind you, no politically questioning street master artist – like Banksy, Shepard Fairy or Retna.

 

Casey Nocket, AKA Creepy Things, decided to use acrylic and tag national treasures like massive boulders in Joshua National Park, Yosemite and Rocky Mountain National Park.   Perhaps she was using peyote and found her Native American spirit.   Had Chief Hosa met this young dame, he likely would have had a wonderful round table to decide who could scalp this misguided soul.   Rather than give further exposure to Ms. Nocket, simply read the breaking story at Modern Hiker.

Some might try to argue that what she created was indeed portrait art.   And yes her “creepy faces” are something that nature would not have even fathomed possible.   What is obvious is how crap in our American and European streets and online can equally inspire the improper efforts of graphic arts educated in grade school.

 

 

Author: Mason Hayutin

Founder, Editor and contributing writer, Mr. Mason Hayutin is recognized for his depth of experience and knowledge in technology, energy economics, and the arts (fine and visual). Having worked with recognized world class artists and their estates since 1997, Mason brings a wealth of practical experiences from installations, marketing and private sales.

An active business advocate, he successfully released the fine art documentary film LUBIE LOVE in 2009 ahead of the global auto crisis – in addition to maintaining his tenure as Vice President of GALLERY M INC. Hayutin holds a degree in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis. You can read his insight here at The Art Quarterly as well as in regional and national publications.

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