The future of fine art fairs

As the astute collector knows galleries are loosely connected by the modern fine art fair. While some are incredible places and adventures into fine art many others are long events where galleries are asked to pay obscene price per square foot rates. The fair organizers come from all walks of life yet each has a responsibility to gather media and advertising, curate compelling statements of art and attract not just the interested academics, their pupils or aspiring-yet-to-be-discovered artists but the fuel-to-the-industry: you, the collector.

Shows that should be avoided at all costs because the fair organizers have lost press and collector interest include the following:

The Los Angeles Art Fair
Red Dot – Miami
Art Expo New York

Shows that are beehives for collectors:

Pulse New York
Art Miami
Art Basel – Switzerland and Miami Beach
Aipad – New York

Shows that are essentially a zoo:

The Armory – Both Piers, New York
Art Basel – Miami Beach

Shows to gain the most attention from participating galleries:

Art Santa Fe
San Francisco Fine Art Fair
Art Hamptons

Shows to enjoy the most of fine art, food and wine:

Art Crush – Aspen

While there are numerous other fairs to consider (and by all means do feel free to add to this) keep in touch with The Art Quarterly. We anticipate guided collector trips in 2012 -13.

Author: Mason Hayutin

Founder, Editor and contributing writer, Mr. Mason Hayutin is recognized for his depth of experience and knowledge in technology, energy economics, and the arts (fine and visual). Having worked with recognized world class artists and their estates since 1997, Mason brings a wealth of practical experiences from installations, marketing and private sales. An active business advocate, he successfully released the fine art documentary film LUBIE LOVE in 2009 ahead of the global auto crisis - in addition to maintaining his tenure as Vice President of GALLERY M INC. Hayutin holds a degree in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis. You can read his insight here at The Art Quarterly as well as in regional and national publications.

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